software

A few iPad apps

I stumble across the occasional app of interest to this site whenever I browse through Apple’s App Store. If you find something, please feel free to post a comment, especially if you frequent the Android store!

Phaeton

Phaeton

The Phaeton brings 18th-century astronomy to the iPad through a modern interpretation of five astronomical instruments of antiquity: the Tellurion, the Grand Orrery, the Astrolabe, the Lunarium and the Jovilabe.

I like the shiny brass effect.

The developers, Tau Ceti Systems, may have moved on from app development, so I’d grab this before it falls into the black hole of discontinued apps…

Orrery

Beautiful in another way is Jan Frischmuth’s Orrery:

Orrery

The 24 hour clock at the bottom goes counterclockwise, which is neat.

You can buy this app for most platforms.

Venice Astronomical Clock of the Piazza San Marco

Masato Mori wrote this simple but appealing simulation of the famous clock in St Mark’s Square, Venice.

VeniceAstronomicalClockPiazzaSanMarco

This is a decorative app based on the clock tower that stands above the Piazza San Marco in Venice. The astronomical clock features the constellations of the twelve signs on a rich blue background, with special attention paid to the detail on the twelve signs. Display it on your iPad or iPhone to add a taste of Venice to your home. The hand on the 24-hour clock moves slowly but surely, allowing you to enjoy the passing of time at a leisurely pace.

The designer sneaked in a 12-hour option, which I’m not sure about!

Market 24h Clock

Yury Barabanov has done quite a good job with his app called Market 24h Clock, although the buttons on some of the other screens are a bit large for my taste. Still, if you want to know when the financial markets round the world are open, this should do the trick:

Market24h

Also available for other platforms.

Observatory

Emerald Sequoia’s Observatory app, a slightly different take on their excellent Chronometer, is slightly compromised (for the purists on this site!) by the 12 hour hands and dial. But the outer 24 hour dial and stunning appearance lets us overlook the omission of 24-hour-only operation. As with Chronometer, it’s an app to take your time and get used to.

ObservatoryAllBig

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The Cosmic Watch (app)

From Markus at Celestial Dynamics comes this beautiful iPhone/iPad/Android app, Cosmic Watch:

COSMIC WATCH ipad time machine

The Cosmic Watch is an interactive 3d tool. You can use it as a realtime worldclock, time travel machine, an astrolab, an antikythera mechanism, an orrery, an armillary sphere, or an astral-chart generator.

The unique thing about the clock face is its ecliptic view around the planet. The complex mechanism of telling time is at the touch of your hands with the Cosmic Watch App.

Cosmic Watch iPhone android worldclock and year

24 hours a day

Applications for iPad and iPhone often make use of the 24 hour dial, mainly because it’s a much simpler interface to the daily routine, showing the entire day at a glance, and avoiding the inevitable confusion between AM and PM.

Rove

Rove is a simple iPhone app that tracks your movements unobtrusively, in the background, and records them, together with any notes and photographs that you take as you go. Billed as private journalling or life-logging, Rove shows your current day (only the current day at present) on a 24 hour dial:

Rove

Owaves

Owaves is, according to the developer, “the world’s first wellness planner”:

Owaves makes it easy to plan health and wellness goals into your day. Colorful and vibrant, with a novel 24-hour clock, the planner is fun to use and lets you see your day in a whole new way. Oriented to sunrise and sunset, Owaves guides you to a balanced lifestyle and healthy circadian rhythm.

Eastern and Western health experts agree there are five main ingredients for a long and healthy life:

-Sleep

-Nutrition

-Exercise

-Mindfulness, Meditation, Yoga, Managing Stress

Love and Social

Owaves is the only day planner in the world designed to let you prioritize these activities alongside work, play and miscellaneous errands.

The planner incorporates input from thought leaders in chronobiology, mindfulness, and professional sports.

It’s Visual. It’s Fun. And it’s Easy-to-use.

owaves health clock

The developer explains:

The clock is oriented with sunrise at traditional 12 o’clock position. Sunrise and sunset are prominently featured and localized based on the user’s location. There’s arguably an epidemic of circadian rhythm disorders going on post-rapid spread of artificial light, so this gentle “nudge” is meant to remind the user that sunrise is the beginning of the day.

– menu of activities focuses on 5 key aspects of preventive health as per the American College of Preventive Medicine and American College of Lifestyle Medicine: exercise, sleep, nutrition, stress management, and love/social

The future plan is to integrate wearable device data to create a feedback loop for wellness and health applications.

Through the lens of wellness and health, the 5 main activities featured – Exercise, Sleep, Nutrition, Relax (i.e. managing stress) and Love/Social (i.e. spending time with loved ones) – are THE activities of interest. Considered the new “lifestyle vital signs” by the American College of Preventive Medicine and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, since they are more prognostic of chances for future morbidity and mortality for today’s generation than the vital signs of the past (i.e. HR, BP, RR, etc.). I.e. they are more helpful in assessing one’s chances of obtaining a chronic disease like: diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression, anxiety, osteoporosis, …

The next version will include: Weekly and Monthly views, Social Sharing Options, a Brief Tutorial and a bit more… And of course, as mentioned, calendar integration and circadian rhythm intelligence are on the books as well.

Owaves is promising, and will become much more useful when calendar integration is implemented.

DayTime for iOS

From the makers of DayTime:

Imagine you are facing south, with the position of the sun marking the current time. Day and night are shown by the light and dark regions above and below. (24-hour day or night appear all light or all dark—try it by choosing Vadsø NO, or the US Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station!) Sunrise and sunset positions are marked where night meets day, and the amount of daylight remaining is the arc from the sun’s position to the sunset line (arrow).

daytime

For example, at 2:00PM on January 1st in Copenhagen, there were less than 2 hours left of daylight—but without computation one can intuitively see very quickly that the short winter day is almost over.

You can download DayTime from the App Store.